Low Angle Block Plane No. 61 White Bronze with Brass Knob

$289.00

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Description

Our interpretation of the Stanley No 61, last made in 1935, comes in four bronze versions.

In Manganese Bronze with a brass front knob or a redgum front knob.
Or, White Bronze with a brass front knob or redgum front knob. We have continued the original Stanley No 61 tradition of offering a front wood knob. Our experience and tests do not show any performance differences between Manganese and White Bronzes, it is just about individual preference.

The body and cap iron are sand cast by hand in Adelaide. Heat treated to relieve metal stress, the plane is CNC machined and then precision ground flat and square. The 35mm wide blade is in PMA11V tool steel, heat treated meticulously to give the best balance between strength and high abrasive retention. So it is easy to sharpen, tough and keeps an edge longer than other tool steels. At a full 5mm thick, this blade will not chatter. The tool is 155mm long and 45mm wide. The tool comes fitted as standard with a Howard Adjuster to give backlash free, silky blade adjustment.

The tolerances are designed to allow up to a .25mm thick shaving. The plane weighs around 910 gm, has a low centre of gravity with magnificent heft allowing power planing that keeps on course.

The blade bed is machined at 12 degrees to the sole of the plane. The blade comes with a 25 degree bevel combining to make a 37 degree cutting angle. The bevel up feature of block planes allows a vast range of flexibility for woodworkers. Increasing or ‘adding to’ the bevel angle on the blade, usually a secondary bevel to the primary 25 degree bevel, allows woodworkers to tackle tough timbers with tear-out potential. Plane end grain with ease with this (sharp) blade geometry…